Leroy Hill has first hearing in domestic violence case

Seattle Seahawks linebacker Leroy Hill appeared in Issaquah Municipal Court on Tuesday morning for a charge related to a domestic violence incident.

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Hill faces a misdemeanor assault charge related to the April 10 incident. During a brief appearance, the court scheduled the next pre-trial hearing for June 11.

Issaquah Police arrested Hill after a late-night domestic incident at his Talus home. Officers said a dispute occurred between Hill and his then-girlfriend. Police said the woman had marks and injuries consistent with assault; she told police Hill caused the injuries.

City Prosecutor Lynn Moberly asked the court to keep a no-contact order in place between Hill and the victim, although the victim had called for the order to be lifted.

“I think that he’s a potential danger to her, and I would ask at this time that the court not lift the no-contact order,” Moberly said.

The prosecutor said the victim had told police Hill had attacked her in the past. Moberly said the past incidents included a dispute when Hill held the victim down on a bed and “crushed her throat.”

The victim did not appear in court due to what Domestic Violence Advocate Kim Leyton described as a scheduling conflict. Leyton said the victim feels the no-contact order to be unnecessary.

“In her words, she feels that she can communicate, quote, effectively and peacefully with” Hill, Leyton said.

Hill and the woman had a three-year relationship prior to the Talus incident.

Judge N. Scott Stewart kept the no-contact order in place.

The domestic violence incident occurred less than a month after Hill pleaded guilty to misdemeanor marijuana possession in Georgia.

The appearance attracted attention to the usually sleepy city courtroom — the same space used as the Issaquah City Council Chambers. Stewart limited cameras in the courtroom to a single still and video camera. Court Administrator Lynne Jacobs said the decision marked the first so-called media order in the five-year history of the court.